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The Strange Story Behind Australia’s Creepy “Festival Ghost”

The internet caught fire earlier this week when a photo taken during the Good Life Festival in Brisbane, Australia seemed to reveal a ghost standing on a ledge overlooking the crowd of revelers.

Image Credit: Good Life Festival via Facebook
Image Credit: Good Life Festival via Facebook

The image circled at right seemed at first glance to be nothing more than an optical anomaly of some kind… until an intrepid user attempted to enhance it, revealing what looks like a young dark-haired girl in a white nightgown, clutching a teddy bear or similar stuffed toy.

Image Credit: Good Life Festival via Facebook
Image Credit: Good Life Festival via Facebook

Rumors immediately began to circulate after a commenter on the Good Life Festival Facebook Page claimed to have identified the girl as Lucy Jane McConnel, who had allegedly died in a fall over a century ago in the warehouse which now serves the Brisbane Showgrounds — a venue for large events like this one, which is targeted at 13- to 17-year-olds.

Image Credit: Good Life Festival via Facebook
Image Credit: Good Life Festival via Facebook

To further bolster the rumor, Good Life’s promoters claim that many Showgrounds staffers believe the warehouse is haunted, and issued an official statement on their Facebook page.

Fest_Ghost_05

Well, we hate to spoil the fun, but skeptics didn’t have to dig too deep to find out that the background tale of “Lucy Jane” is a myth — and that the “haunted warehouse” rumors have been largely refuted by the staff.

According to TheMusic.com.au, there did exist a James Henry McConnel, a former president of Queensland’s Royal National Agricultural & Industrial Association, who was mentioned in the haunting legend as the girl’s father… but he never had a daughter named Lucy Jane, and that name was not found in any official birth & death records.

Fest_Ghost_01

Despite this information, the festival organizers continue to claim that the spectral figure in the photo, regardless of her true identity, is not a fake, and was saved directly from the photographer’s camera without further enhancement.

“It is very difficult to find facts amongst so many urban legends and very little records,” the promoters responded on Facebook. “[T]he image is what it is, we want to believe, we will let you make up your own mind.”

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